The Full-Length Fabulous Beast is Going to Be a Thing in the World. Which is Pretty Cool.

Waaaaaaaayyyyy back in September of last year, I wrote:
OH. And I kinda-sorta have the best news in the world (for me, right now) but I can't post anything until I know more/confirm said best news in a legit way. Anyway, that's vague, but pretty accurate. When I can, I'll spill.
And then it took another four months to actually confirm the best news. So THAT was pretty underwhelming. But now I finally feel more comfortable sharing the following:

I signed a book contract, ya'll!
In September, I was notified that my full-length manuscript, Fabulous Beast, was the runner-up for the X.J. Kennedy Prize and that it was selected for publication in the fall of 2019. The contract didn't arrive until January, but it's finally signed. (Yay!) And now we're moving into book cover stuff and that's making everything feel more real.

Most of the first section of this manuscript was published as a chapbook by Hyacinth Girl Press in 2015, as Fabulous Beast: The Sow. Having that little book out in the world has meant so much to me -- Margaret Bashaar, the editor, creates beautiful books and supports her authors with a tireless energy. I've been so grateful to be a Hyacinth Girl author, and I've been introduced to (both in-person and electronically, over social media) a supportive community of fellow poets through the press.

But now it's really exciting to think of the second section, a ten-chapter fairy tale written in Spenserian stanzas (hahaha, it sounds AWESOME, doesn't it?) and the third section, poems employing the imagery of Norse and Greek myths, being out in the world, too. I worked so hard on this manuscript, and put so much time and energy (and yes, money) into submissions to various awards and calls for publication, it's really gratifying to know the entire book will be a real-life object soon. 

Also ... I've wanted to be an author since I was 12. At least. Having a book in print isn't just the realization of several years' work, but the realization of an ambition I've fostered for most of my life. Granted, my life and/or career isn't going to shift dramatically because of this publication and few poets earn a ton of money or accolades from their books, but that's not why I did this. I did this for 12-year old Sarah, who, for some reason, really really really wanted to do what her heroes did. So here's one major (for me) step in that direction.

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